The best anime releases of all time

Few mediums take seriously their title as an anime. A typical 90 -second run, these openings have become eponymous with the entire culture.

These little music videos are important in setting the stage – sometimes in a very deceptive way – by presenting images and moments (if done correctly) that clearly describe the character, even if The observer does not know.

If you are looking for a story of evil, monsters or love, By SpectrumThe list of important introductions will keep you hooked on your upcoming anime binge:

“Cowboy Bebop” – “Tank!”

“3, 2, 1 let’s hold.”

Speaking of which, “Cowboy Bebop” viewers have no idea what’s to come: a jazz attack and moving silhouettes of Spike, Jet, Faye, Ed and Ein.

Using “Tank!” only Seatbelts combine the fun of the process with some of the most bombastic jazz ever recorded. With footage recorded as the melody beats, culminating in an epic ending, newcomers will appreciate the fact that high -end jazz of this caliber can be heard throughout the course of ” Cowboy Bebop’s “26-episode run.

Perfectly matched by the series ’high octane energy while presenting each member of The Bebop in a fun way, the release of“ Cowboy Bebop ”powerfully sets the show apart. while casting viewers into ignorance, to give them a simple taste of what is to come. .

“Baccano!” – “Guns and Roses”

Much to the chagrin of the introduction to Guy Ritchie’s directed film “Snatch,” “Baccano!’ S ”opening introduced the entire cast. With each style given only a few seconds of defense time, writers and artists use their time wisely to make sure to give the right first impression, if a friend, a friend. it is fear or intimidation.

With Paradise Lunch’s “Gun’s & Roses” serving as a sequel to the series, each image is seen in ingenious work, gently revealing the arcs without the need for irony.

But best of all, the various scenes of different types and locations reveal a plethora of ideas that are about to be woven into the epic story of the evil “Baccano!”

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“Neon Genesis Evangelion” – “He Thesis a Angel Angel”

No introduction was misleading, but very reasonable.

The introduction of “Neon Genesis Evangelion” isn’t hard to laugh at. With an uplifting song in the style of “A Cruel Angel’s Thesis” and interesting visuals of many – human or not – the viewer feels unaware of the competition of action, love and with a laugh.

That is the main strength of this introduction.

There is nothing to prepare the audience for the laughter and the colors of the opening. Mental anguish or violent conflicts, “Neon Genesis Evangelion” is a true story. no The warriors are imagined in the stories, but because of the real flaws that have been created in our population. The youngsters passed away with impossibility of navigation and power. In their place, “Evangelion” presents a more realistic demonstration of the young man’s feelings if they were the only human hope to fight the monsters of epic power: fear, loneliness and loneliness. powerless.

This difference of style between the show itself and its opening only reveals the desolate ideas expressed by its images.

“Ouran High School Hospitality Association” – “Cherry Blossom Kiss”

“Kiss Kiss, fall in love!”

The first words you hear when looking at “Ouran High School Host Club” are that you are very interested. in stock sing along with. The words are important so you don’t deny the quasi-incest of real anime (Did we say PG was listed?).

According to the Ouran Host Club, the school is a musician, where “the best boys of the school have a lot of time on their hands to entertain the young women who also have it. ala a lot of time is in their hands.

The intro perfectly captures the Wattpad-esque script and lacks a sense of the basics. The line “maybe you are the one I love” is about Haruhi’s favorite people in the show, from the youth group leader to the royal association president. It may seem awkward at first, but the anime is about adult levels and has a positive impact.

Haruhi Fujioka, a “citizen” who tried school, was welcomed into the group’s “beautiful world” after breaking an eight million yen ($ 72,600) container. At first, the company mistakenly thought he was a boy and returned the debt as a “dog” to the hospitality company. But when they realized she could – and her husband – she went under the receptionist, and invited the other female students to pay her debt.

If you’re a Wattpad kid, or are looking for a fun anime to spend time on, this is the show for you.

“Ping Pong the Animation” – “Tadahitori”

From the first cry, “Tadahitori” sets the stage for a high -profile sports anime. The kind of music that is perfect for someone’s cardio class, the release of “Ping Pong the Animation” just demands a look.

While the anime itself often focuses on the ever -evolving nature of the concept, “Tadahitori” presents its audience with lightning bolts and in your face.

Set at the back of “Ping Pong’s” which can easily be seen in the hand -pulling style, “Tadahitori” is as independent as the art itself.

“Beck Mongolian Chop Squad” – “Hit in the USA”

With its catchy melodies and unapologetically 2000s style, “Hit in the USA” is the best earworm that can be given an anime opening.

Capturing the spirit of a scrappy team with high expectations, where “Beck Mongolian Chop Squad” lacks luster in animation, it fulfills its sound.

For an anime that focuses on music and the process of forming a group, it provides its opening with a song that can be found on a simple radio.

Some are listening, and you are singing, “I was made in America.”

“One Punch Man” – “The Hero”

By selling power, I may have lost something important to the person.

These words were uttered by the main character of Saitama, known as “One Punch Man,” in the first episode of the anime. Throughout the show, Saitama seeks a suitable enemy to rekindle his love of war – making this line an ideal encapsulation of the show.

“The Hero” balances between the goofiness of the actual anime and the seriousness of Saitama’s status. The hand shown is the last seen by Saitama’s enemies, and the other images show the enemies looking into the camera as if they were facing an observer. The powerful film introduces viewers to both the characters and “One Punch Man’s” and reveals that the viewer will not understand Saitama’s fatigue. In almost every scene, Saitama can find one, to introduce and direct his lonely thoughts to the anime. Overall, the anime and the intro complement each other well in a way that no other intro can.

“Samurai Champloo” – “Battlefield”

Just a good show that lo-fi Nujabes can get the head in his music. At the beginning of the opening memoirs of “Battlecry”, the three protagonists – Mugen, Jin and Fuu – are introduced with interesting images that show their fun, but try not to give too much to them.

Other works by samurai Mugen and Jin are featured, supported by songs from rapper Shing02 to boast as well as the show. The art and beat are well -combined to create a two -dimensional combat style.

Shing02’s words are very appropriate: “While my mind is at peace, there is no world / Lose the heat inside, life is colder.”

When the songs end on the rest beat, the three are seen going on their journey, instead of being replaced with a beautiful vinyl.

“Death Parade” – “Nā Pele”

“Neon Genesis Evangelion” offers a run for its money in the form of deceptive introductions, “Flyers” gives viewers a fun and energetic opening set against a tempting wall full of temptation games.

On Netflix

“Death Parade” is a Japanese anime movie story.

However, while the main character of “Death Parade” is like a party and doing kickline actions at the opening, the actual anime is even more intense when the deceased plays the characters. various games to determine the fate of their souls.

For a show that can often be stressful, “Flyers” provides the levity and humor that is much needed for its viewers.

If nothing else, the silly dance moves and colorful sequences will delight the audience and shake their heads and sing, “Put your hands up!”

“Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood” – “Golden Time Love”

The third release of the much -loved story, “Golden Time Lover,” clearly shows the growing power and darkness of “Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood.”

Synth voices are what make the back of Edward Elrics’s outstretched hand, as he stands amidst a garden of white flowers like a gray sky above.

The circle came as the opening ended with Edward’s hand falling to the ground, revealing an uncut flower between his fingers.

A glimmer of hope between the turbulent and demoralizing landscape has become “Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood” at this time of the year.

The finale, “Golden Time Lover,” is a perfect example of this balance between eternal goodwill and perseverance against the vicious influences of this anime world.

Honorable Members:

Alex:

“Mushishi” – “The Sore Feet Song”

“Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood” – “Time”

“Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood” – “Ua”

Kara:

“Kakegurui” – “Dealing with the Devil”

“Sailor Moon” – “Moonlight Densetsu”

“Demon Killer” – “Gurenge”

“Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood” – “Return”

Jenna:

“Jujutsu Kaisen” – “Kakai Kitan”

“My Hero Academia” – “The Sun, the Peaceful Sign,” “ODD FUTURE,” “Make My Story,” “Polaris & Starmaker”

“Great start!” – “Dramatic”

“Haikyuu” – “Think,” “Ah Yes !!,” “I Believe,” “Fly,” “Hikari Are” & “Phoenix”

Kara Anderson is a senior professional editor and can be found at kara.anderson@ubspectrum.com

Alex Falter is an art editor and can be found at alex.falter@ubspectrum.com

Jenna Quinn is the main relationship editor and can be found at jenna.quinn@ubspectrum.com


ALEX FALTER

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Alex Falter is a senior art editor at By Spectrum.


KARA ANDERSON

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Kara Anderson is an art editor at By Spectrum. English and Spanish are fluent speakers and she is seeking a certificate in writing. She enjoys cooking chocolate cookies, hanging out with solitaire and binging reality TV on the weekends.


JENNA QUINN

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Jenna Quinn is the chief relationship editor at By Spectrum. When he’s not rolling on social media, you can see him watching Mets games on his computer or Jack Harlow.

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